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Space Station™

Details

OU9609

Summary

Space Station™ is a single-wall, base-camp tent, dining hall, communications center or hospital. The canopy’s domed shape minimizes wind load and is practically impervious to water and UV damage thanks to waterproof and titanium oxide coatings. Space Station’s three zippered doors, large roof vent and five perimeter vents help circulate air and provide exit options. Bar-tacked stress points and nylon pack cloth reinforcements add durability to the structure which is supported by strong DAC Expedition PF poles. Perimeter floor band makes waterproof seats when snow benches are carved.
$3,499.90 $5,000.00
Style# 1367552
product.components.activity Alpine Climbing

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Features & Specs

  • Weight: - 70 lb. 14 oz. / 32.07 kg. -
  • Fit: - True to Size -
  • Tent Capacity: - 15 -
  • Good For: - Alpine Climbing -

Summary

Space Station™ is a single-wall, base-camp tent, dining hall, communications center or hospital. The canopy’s domed shape minimizes wind load and is practically impervious to water and UV damage thanks to waterproof and titanium oxide coatings. Space Station’s three zippered doors, large roof vent and five perimeter vents help circulate air and provide exit options. Bar-tacked stress points and nylon pack cloth reinforcements add durability to the structure which is supported by strong DAC Expedition PF poles. Perimeter floor band makes waterproof seats when snow benches are carved.

Details

Materials

  • Pole Type: Paleria DAC Pressfit™
  • Fabric Fly: 180D Nylon Taffetta 1500mm PU/SIL
  • Fabric Canopy: 20D Nylon Knit Mesh;180D Nylon Taffetta 1500mm PU/SIL

Measurements

  • Weight Packed: 70 lb. 14 oz. / 32.07 kg.
  • Weight Minimum: 68 lb. 11 oz. / 31.07 kg.
  • Tent Capacity: 15
  • Number of Poles: 15
  • Number of Doors: 3
  • Number of Vestibules: 0
  • Height Interior: 101" / 257 cm
  • Length Packed: 39 in / 99 cm
  • Diameter Packed: 23 in / 60 cm
  • Tent Floor Area: 309 sq. ft. / 28.7 m2

    Details

  • Industry leading DAC Pressfit™ poles.
  • UPDATED: DAC Pressfit™ poles.
  • DAC Presssfit Poles made and engineered using the stongest aluminum
  • Titanium Dioxide coated 40D fly fabric
  • Internal guy system with O-rings at intersections
  • Reflective zipper pulls
  • 3 doors with dual sliders
  • 5 SVX windows
  • 1 large zippered top thru-vent
  • 10 lower adjustable vents
  • 400D external snow flaps
  • 70D internal perimeter skirt seals tent with optional footprint
  • Expedition duffle for transportation

Reviews

Space Station™ 4 5 1 1
Preliminary review: First set-up Here are some things we learned from the first setup: There are three set of poles, five of each colour(Red, Silver, Black) Assemble them ans set them off in a safe place where they will not get stepped on. The poles are long and take some time to assemble all fifteen. Put at least three stakes in, on the wind side, to keep the tent from blowing away. Those stakes will also help when you are pushing the poles into the grommets. It is better to set the red and silver poles on top of the tent and clip them in, starting from the outside and working your way to the center. You might want to colour code the clips(with a permanent marker) so that you know which poles are going to be running through each one. Point the clips from orange to orange(Not from grey to grey)on the fabric so that two poles will fit through without binding the clip. Unzip the top vent hole before putting on the fly so that you have air coming inside the tent when it expands. Be careful where you step when walking on top of the tent and installing the poles, you really don't want to step on two crossed poles. It is also important to install the fly before popping up the tent. We, one of us is over six feet tall, couldn't reach the clips after we had the tent up. Then, with one side of the poles already installed in the grommets, the second person crawls inside the tent and pushes up while the outside person pushes the poles into the other grommets. It's better to start with a couple of the red poles because they run over the top. The black poles are installed pretty easily and quickly on the sides. You are given 200 meters of uncut cord to be used for the guy lines, consider buying heavier weight cord for the outside guys and leaving them attached to the tent. You may also want to invest in sturdier stakes if you plan on setting up in harsh environments. I haven't tried installing the, recommended, internal guy lines yet. The seams are taped but not sealed, you are given a lot of seam sealer and asked to apply it if you plan on being in a wet environment. Things learned from the takedown: If you don't unzip the top vent and doors, the tent takes a little time to deflate. Velcro bands should be added to each of the tent poles to keep them together and make them easier to manage. The rubber bands used during the shipping are good but they will break down quickly or get lost. I left the floor(footprint) installed so that who ever has to crawl inside isn't gonna be crawling around on the bare ground. I also left the window covers installed inside to keep them from getting lost when setting up the tent. We used a fold to the center method of putting the tent away. I'm going to try an additional fold in half, lengthwise, next time I roll it up. When packing up the tent, makes sure it is the just about the length of the expedition bag(dufflebag) or it will roll too thick to fit inside. Don't roll the poles in with the tent, you won't be able to get to the poles if they are. The poles need to be assembled before rolling out your tent to minimize wind exposure. And the pole bags will keep the tent from getting caught in the exped bag zipper. Overall The tent might work as a makeshift field hospital but it isn't as large as some of the really expensive double-walled "clean room" tents. It is the right size for a meeting room, or dinning room use, especially without the floor. I wouldn't want to fit fifteen people inside unless they are just bodies or don't mind being packed in tightly. You can sleep eight people with cots; or six people, or four couples, with a couple weeks worth of gear, but it will be cozy. The vent holes that surround the base provide a means to run power cords or vent a portable AC/heater unit. If nothing else you could hook up a cheap exhaust fan and get some really good air circulation. I'll know more about how I feel about this tent After I get back from actually using it. July 5, 2012
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